Tag Archives: Huguenot Cemetery

Dr. William Robertson and Mrs. Ann Frazer Robertson

Gate for the Robertson Plot

Gate to the Robertson plot at Huguenot Cemetery.

Dr. William Marshall Robertson and his wife, Ann Frazer Robertson, were already residents of St. Augustine when Florida became a territory of the United States in 1821. Both were originally from Scotland and Ann’s brother, John Frazer, owned a plantation near the Georgia border. Dr. Robertson became a naturalized citizen but died soon after – in 1823. Ann would continue to live in St. Augustine until her death in 1850. Their box graves are each covered with marble slabs. They read:

DEDICATED
to the MEMORY
of
Doctor Wm. ROBERTSON
by his only child

DEDICATED
to the MEMORY
of
Mrs. Ann ROBERTSON
by her only child

Col. Charles W. Bulow

Ledger stone covering the box tomb of Col. Charles W. Bulow.
Photo from the author’s collection at Flickr.

Underneath
this stone
are deposited the remains of
Coln.  CHARLES W. BULOW
of Charleston So. Ca.
who died on the 1st of May
1823
aged 44 years.

A prominent native of Charleston, South Carolina, Bulow came to Florida during the transfer of government from Spain to the United States. He purchased more than 4,000 acres about 30 miles south of St. Augustine where he raised sugar cane, cotton, indigo and rice. He also owned a house on the bayfront in St. Augustine.

Col. Bulow did not get to enjoy watching his holdings grow and prosper because he died in 1823 (May 1st on his grave, but May 7th in his published obituary). His son, John, who was 17 and studying in Paris at the time of his father’s death, would take over the Florida enterprise and turn it into the largest sugar mill in east Florida. In 1836, the plantation was destroyed by Seminole Indians.

Today it is protected as Bulow Plantation Ruins Historic State Park – part of Florida’s state park system.

Baby Castle

Baby Castle

R. Castle

son of
Martin Castle
of Connecticut
Died
Nov. 28, 1878.
Aged 4 Month
& 16 Day
May he rest in Peace.

This broken headstone marks the grave of a baby boy. Although his name was on the missing piece of headstone, an 1892 inventory of this cemetery published in the New England Historical and Genealogical Society’s Register lists him as R. Castle. The 1880 census of St. Augustine has a Martin Castle, age 36, listed showing his place of birth as Connecticut. His wife, Julia, is from South Carolina and her age is 23. Their daughter, Louisa, is 5 months old.

Gate for the Robertson Plot

Gate to the Robertson plot at Huguenot Cemetery.

Dr. William Marshall Robertson and his wife, Ann Frazer Robertson, were already residents of St. Augustine when Florida became a territory of the United States in 1821. Both were originally from Scotland and Ann’s brother, John Frazer, owned a plantation near the Georgia border. Dr. Robertson became a naturalized citizen but died soon after – in 1823. Ann would continue to live in St. Augustine until her death in 1850. Their box graves are each covered with marble slabs. They read:

DEDICATED
to the MEMORY
of
Doctor Wm. ROBERTSON
by his only child
DEDICATED
to the MEMORY
of
Mrs. Ann ROBERTSON
by her only child

Dr. J. Hume Simons

Dr. J. Hume Simons

Carved on the monument is the following epitaph:

Dr. J. Hume Simons
born at
Charleston S.C.
Oct. 20, 1818
died at
St. Augustine, Fla.
June 25, 1876

Inscription on the back of the monument reads:

A learned man
He graduated at the College of Charleston, SC
Awarded first Honor by the medical faculty of that city at the commencement in 1838

Dr. Simons was the author of The Planter’s Guide and Family Book of Medicine, described as “for the instruction and use of planters, families, country people, and all others who may be out of the reach of physicians, or unable to employ them.”

Born and raised in Charleston, he married Eliza Wigfall in 1841 and they had five children. During the Civil War, he served as a Captain in Simon’s Company. He came to St. Augustine in 1869 where he practiced medicine and taught school.

There are several interesting tidbits related to this grave.  First, the monument tips because it was originally set on a wooden base, which has long since rotted.  The heavy equipment necessary to reset the stone correctly would most likely cause serious damage to the graveyard so it’s doubtful this stone will ever be straight again.

An 1892 inventory of this cemetery describes Dr. Simons grave as:
Dr. J. Hume Simons.
Lot with paling fence around – the size of one grave, and nailed to paling at head of grave a heart-shaped shield with zinc plat nailed to it containing above name.

At this point, I do not know when the monument was actually placed here in the cemetery.